Idaho Minimum Wage Laws – 2022


Minimum Wage

Idaho’s current minimum wage is $7.25. ID Statute 44-1502.

Idaho employers must also comply with federal minimum wage laws, which currently sets the federal minimum wage at $7.25. See FLSA: Minimum Wage.


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Tip Minimum Wage

Idaho’s minimum wage for tipped employees is $3.35.

If employers decide to pay employees the tipped minimum wage, they must also ensure the employees are paid the standard minimum wage when tips received by the employees are combined with the tipped wages earned. 

If employees are not paid the standard minimum wage when tips and tipped wages are combined, employers must make up the difference. 

If a dispute arises between an employer and employee the amount of tips received by the employee, the employer is responsible for verifying the amount.

ID Statute 44-1502(2)


Tip Pooling and Sharing

Employers can require employees to participate in a tip pooling or sharing agreement. If employees participate in a tip pooling arrangement, an employer may only count the tips received by each employee after they are split as that employee’s tips. ID Statute 44-1502(2)


Subminimum wage

Employees with disabilities

Idaho minimum wage laws do not apply to employees with disabilities if the employer has been issued a special certificate pursuant to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. ID Statute 44-1505


Trainees

Idaho minimum wage laws allow employers to pay employees who are under twenty (20) years old $4.25 per hour during the first 90 consecutive calendar days after the employees begin working for the employees.

Employers may not displace other employees for purposes of hiring a trainee employee. Impermissibly displacing employees include reducing hours, wages, or employment benefits. ID Statute 44-1502(3)


Apprentices

Idaho minimum wage laws allow the Idaho Department of Labor to issue special licenses allowing employers to pay apprentices a wage rate that is lower than the standard minimum wage.

The time, conditions, and wage rate applicable to the apprentice will be included in the special license. The Department of Labor may hold hearings or conduct a necessary investigation prior to approving a special wage for the apprentice. ID Statute 44-1506


Learners

Idaho minimum wage laws allow the Idaho Department of Labor to issue special licenses allowing employers to pay learners a wage rate that is lower than the standard minimum wage. 

The time, conditions, and wage rate applicable to the learner will be included in the special license. The Department of Labor may hold hearings or conduct a necessary investigation prior to approving a special wage for the learner.


Student learners

Idaho minimum wage laws allow the Idaho Department of Labor to issue special licenses allowing employers to pay student learners a wage rate that is lower than the standard minimum wage. 

A student learner is defined as an individual enrolled in a bona fide secondary school program administered by an accredited school district which includes work training experience. 

The time, conditions, and wage rate applicable to the student learner will be included in the special license. 

The Department of Labor may hold hearings or conduct a necessary investigation prior to approving a special wage for the student learner. ID Statute 44-1506


Student workers

Idaho minimum wage laws allow Idaho minimum wage laws allow the Idaho Department of Labor to issue special licenses allowing employers to pay full-time students a wage rate that is lower than the standard minimum wage if the full-time student qualifies as a student learner. ID Statute 44-1506


Idaho Minimum Wage Laws 2022 FAQs

Will there be a minimum wage increase in Idaho in 2022?

At the moment of writing, Idaho has a minimum wage of $7.25. This is in line with them following the federal minimum wage.

They are one of the 21 states that still follow the federal minimum wage law for their employees’ minimum wage rates. However, there is an ongoing effort to increase this rate to $12 per hour by June 2024.

This has unfortunately been stalled due to the current global health crisis. Only time will tell when this initiative will eventually become a success.

Is the unemployment benefit of Idaho the same rate as its minimum wage?

Minimum wage increases are sought after to lessen the significant difference in wages between workers. These extreme wages can lead to poverty, while steep wage hikes can lead to lay-offs and unemployment.

The main goal is to have future wages reach a livable wage, something that can adapt to cost of living changes, cost of housing, and the like. A living wage is computed based on the cost of living index and is usually updated annually.

Fortunately, some initiatives can protect the unemployed, like the unemployment insurance claim (or UI). Also referred to as the unemployment benefit, a state program developed to provide weekly financial support to those eligible for it.

Unemployment benefits of $600 per week are usually given. This is the same as what a $15 minimum wage rate can give you after a week’s worth of working hours.

Hence, it is safe to say that unemployment benefits are not the same rate as its minimum wage. It can even be higher. This makes the minimum wage proposal for future increases more pressing.

What do business owners need to know about minimum wage laws in Idaho?

There are many things that business owners need to know to keep their operations running smoothly. It is understandable why many of them focus more on product and service research and development, branding, accounting, marketing, and sales.

However, it is also crucial to stay on top of labor laws, employee rights, and other critical aspects of managing human resources. For instance, it is essential to know the different types of employees and how each of them can vary in the wage they are legally entitled to receive.

Contract employees and full-time employees can have different benefits depending on different factors.

An employee with health insurance may receive a lower minimum wage than those who don’t receive any coverage. There are also certain employee types where labor law exemptions can apply.These are just some of the varying factors to consider when hiring new talent and when formulating your employee retention strategies.


Other State’s Minimum Wage Information

AlabamaHawaiiMassachusettsNew MexicoSouth Dakota
AlaskaIdahoMichiganNew YorkTennessee
ArizonaIllinoisMinnesotaNorth CarolinaTexas
ArkansasIndianaMississippiNorth DakotaUtah
CaliforniaIowaMissouriOhioVermont
ColoradoKansasMontanaOklahomaVirginia
ConnecticutKentuckyNebraskaOregonWashington
DelawareLouisianaNevadaPennsylvaniaWest Virginia
District of ColumbiaMaineNew HampshireRhode IslandWisconsin
FloridaMarylandNew JerseySouth CarolinaWyoming
Georgia

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We hope you find our newsletters help you better navigate employment and labor law issues.