South Carolina Minimum Wage Laws – 2022


Minimum wage

South Carolina has not established a state minimum wage rate. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the minimum wage set forth in that law would typically apply. Currently, the federal minimum wage is $7.25.


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Tip minimum wage

South Carolina does not have minimum wage or overtime laws and, thus, has not established a tipped minimum wage. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for tipped wages set forth in that law typically apply.


Tip pooling and sharing

South Carolina does not have minimum wage or overtime laws and, thus, has not established a rules regarding tip or gratuity pooling. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for tip or gratuity pooling set forth in that law typically apply.


Subminimum wage

Employees with disabilities

South Carolina does not have minimum wage laws and, thus, does not address subminimum wage rates employers may pay to employees with disabilities. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for wage rates for employees with disabilities set forth in that law typically apply.


Trainees

South Carolina does not have minimum wage laws and, thus, does not address subminimum wage rates employers may pay to trainees. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for wage rates for trainees set forth in that law typically apply.


Apprentices

South Carolina does not have minimum wage laws and, thus, does not address subminimum wage rates employers may pay to apprentices. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for minimum wage rates for apprentices set forth in that law typically apply.


Learners

South Carolina does not have minimum wage laws and, thus, does not address subminimum wage rates employers may pay to learners. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for minimum wage rates for learners set forth in that law typically apply.


Student learners

South Carolina does not have minimum wage laws and, thus, does not address subminimum wage rates employers may pay to student learners. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for minimum wage rates for student learners set forth in that law typically apply.


Student workers

South Carolina does not have minimum wage laws and, thus, does not address subminimum wage rates employers may pay to student workers. Because most employers and employees in South Carolina are subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the standards for minimum wage rates for student workers set forth in that law typically apply.

South Carolina Minimum Wage Laws 2022 FAQs

Will there be a minimum wage increase in South Carolina in 2022?

The answer will depend on two factors, namely the federal rate and how the minimum wage increase bill will move forward.

South Carolina’s minimum wage rules currently follow the federal minimum wage. Unlike other states, it has yet to implement an initial state minimum wage.

This also means that any changes that the federal rate will undergo will also reflect on South Carolina’s rates.

As for the minimum wage increase bill, it has been proposed back in 2020 that the South Carolina minimum wage be raised to $15.

Should this be passed into law, the state will have its own minimum wage categories and would even pave the way for a future wage increase closely based on the living wage estimate in South Carolina.

There have been no updates on both grounds, though, so we don’t expect an hourly wage increase anytime soon.

How will the minimum wage be applied to different employee types in South Carolina?

Minimum wage rules apply to different types of employees. Since South Carolina follows the federal rate, though, this means that the state does not particularly address this for now, as you might have noticed in the subminimum wage section above.

For more information, though, here’s how the minimum wage is applied to seasonal employees, domestic employees, and professional employees一categories that business owners frequently ask.

  • Seasonal Employees: Employees working in recreation businesses and have been deemed to provide seasonal amusement are exempt from South Carolina’s minimum wage requirements.
  • Domestic Employees: Casual babysitters and those providing care for the elderly and the disabled are exempt from South Carolina’s minimum wage requirements. However, when an employee of the domestic service works for more than 40 hours a week will be entitled to overtime wage.
  • Professional Employees: Those in executive, administrative, and other professional positions are exempt from South Carolina’s minimum wage requirements. These may also include clerical workers and those who have particular computer-related jobs.

Are young and student workers allowed to earn minimum wage in South Carolina?

We understand why some business owners are starting to consider hiring trainees, apprentices, and student workers in an attempt to lower wage expenses.

According to the minimum wage law, a business owner may pay a youth minimum wage of $4.25 during their training period or the first 90 days of employment. This is particularly true for businesses with peak and off-peak seasons.

This is possible as long as you comply with the following rules:

  • Minors (aged 14 to 15) are not allowed to work during school hours.
  • They may work during non-school weeks, but not more than 40 hours.
  • They may also work during the summer break, but not before 7:00 in the morning and after 7:00 in the evening.
  • You must offer them a flexible work hour plan. You must also prioritize their health and safety.

Non-compliance with labor laws can present legal issues and even monetary damages.


Other State’s Minimum Wage Information

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AlaskaIdahoMichiganNew YorkTennessee
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ColoradoKansasMontanaOklahomaVirginia
ConnecticutKentuckyNebraskaOregonWashington
DelawareLouisianaNevadaPennsylvaniaWest Virginia
District of ColumbiaMaineNew HampshireRhode IslandWisconsin
FloridaMarylandNew JerseySouth CarolinaWyoming
Georgia

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