Georgia Child Labor Laws


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Georgia child labor laws set forth the rules and limitations regarding the days and time children under the age of 18 years old may work in Georgia. They also clarify and limit the types of work children under the age of 14 and youth who are 14, 15, 16, and 17 year olds may work. It is also important to remember that businesses and youth workers must comply with the federal child labor laws set forth in the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Below is information about Georgia child labor law rules and limitations.

How old do you have to be to work in Georgia?

Under Georgia child labor laws, youth must be 14-years-old or older to get a job and work in Georgia with a few exceptions. GA Statutes 39-2-1 to 21, Georgia Department of Labor – Child Labor FAQ

These exemption include:

  • Working for a parent or a person standing in the place of a parent who owns the business;
  • Performing agriculture jobs; and
  • Providing domestic service in a private home.

What days can a minor work in Georgia?

Georgia child labor laws do not limit the days of the week youth may work in Georgia. However, Georgia rules limit the times during a day a minor may work.


What times during the day can a minor work in Georgia?

The times during a day a minor may work in Georgia varies based on 1) whether they are under 16 year old or not, and 2) whether the work will be during school weeks or non-school weeks. GA Statutes 39-2-1 to 21, Georgia Department of Labor – Child Labor FAQ

For youth that are 16-years-old and 17-years-old, Georgia child labor laws do not restrict the times during a workday in which they work, except an employer may not require a minor to work when the minor is supposed to be in school.

For youth that are 14-years-old and 15-years old, Georgia child labor laws restrict the times during the day in which they work depending whether the times are during school weeks, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., or non-school weeks, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

AgeSchool Weeks
(Labor Day to June 1)
Non-School Weeks
(June 1 to Labor Day)
What times can a 14-year-old work?7 a.m. until 7 p.m.7 a.m. until 9 p.m.
What times can a 15-year-old work?7 a.m. until 7 p.m.7 a.m. until 9 p.m.
What times can a 16-year-old work?No restrictionNo restriction
What times can a 17-year-old work?No restrictionNo restriction

How many hours can a minor work each day in Georgia?

Under the FLSA and Georgia child labor laws, children that are 14-years-old and 15-years-old may work no more than 8 hours in a work day when combining school and work hours. For example, if a 15-year-old goes to school for 7 hours one day, they could only work 1 hour on that day.

Under Georgia child labor laws, children that are 16-years-old and 17-years-old are not restricted regarding how many hours they may work in a work day.

AgeMax Hours Work Each Day
(School days)
Max Hours Work Each Day
(Non-school days)
How many hours can a 14-year-old work each day?38
How many hours can a 15-year-old work each day?38
How many hours can a 16-year-old work each day?No restrictionNo restriction
How many hours can a 17-year-old work each day?No restrictionNo restriction

How many hours can a minor work each week in Georgia?

Under the FLSA and Georgia child labor laws, children that are 14-years-old and 15-years-old may work no more than 24 hours in a workweek during school weeks and 48 hours during non-school weeks.

Under Georgia child labor laws, children that are 16-years-old and 17-years-old are not restricted regarding how many hours they may work in a work week.

AgeMax Hours Worked Each Week
School Weeks
(Labor Day to June 1)
Max Hours Worked Each Week
Non-School Weeks
(June 1 to Labor Day)
How many hours can a 14-year-old work each week?1840
How many hours can a 15-year-old work each week?1840
How many hours can a 16-year-old work each week?No restrictionNo restriction
How many hours can a 17-year-old work each week?No restrictionNo restriction

What kinds of jobs can a minor work in Georgia?

Under Georgia child labor laws, 14-year-olds and 15-year-olds may only work in the following occupations so long as they do not include hazardous job duties:

Office and Clerical WorkLoading onto Motor Vehicles and the Unloading from Motor VehiclesWork In Connection with Riding Inside Passenger Compartments of Motor Vehicles
Work Of An Intellectual or Artistically Creative NatureErrand And Delivery WorkWork Experience and Career Exploration Programs (WECEP)
CookingCleanup WorkWork-Study Program (WSP)
Cashiering, Selling, Modeling, Art Work, Work In Advertising Departments, Window Trimming and Comparative ShoppingKitchen WorkThe Occupation of Lifeguard (15 year olds only)
Price Marking and Tagging by Hand or by MachineCleaning Kitchen EquipmentWork in Connection with Cars and Trucks that includes Dispensing gasoline and oil, Courtesy service on premises of gasoline service station, and Car cleaning, washing, and polishing by hand.
Bagging and Carrying Out Customer Orders

GA Dept. of Labor – Hazardous Occupations

Under the FLSA and Georgia child labor laws, employees under 18 years old may not work in jobs that are considered hazardous. Here is a list of the jobs that are considered hazardous. FLSA, GA Statutes 39-2-1 to 21, Georgia Department of Labor – Child Labor FAQ

In, about or in conjunction with any public messenger or deliver service, bowling alley, pool room, billiard room, skating rink (except an ice skating rink owned and operated by a school or unit of local government); exhibition park or place of amusement, garage or as a bell boy in any hotel or rooming house or about or in connection with power-driver machinery.In the operation of machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock, or in the operation of power-driven punching, shearing, stamping or meta [late pending machinesIn oil refineries, gasoline blending plants or pumping stations on oil transmission linesIn logging operations
In the oiling, cleaning or wiling of machinery or shaftingIn or about sawmills or lath, shingle or cooperage stock millsIn operation of laundry, dry cleaning or dying machineryIn public and private utilities and related services
In or about any mine or quarryIn the operation of power driven woodworking machines or off bearing from circular sawsIn occupations involving exposure to radioactive substancesIn operations in or in connection with slaughtering, meat packing, poultry processing and fish and seafood processing
In stone cutting or polishingIn the operation of freight elevators or hoisting machines and cranesIn or about any filling station or service stationIn operations which involve working on an elevated surface, with or without use of equipment, including but not limited to ladders and scaffolds
In or about any hazardous factory workIn spray painting or in occupations involving exposure to lead or its compounds or to dangerous or poisonous dyes or chemicalsIn construction work, including demolition and repairIn security positions or any occupation that requires the use or carrying of a firearm or other weapon
In or about any plant manufacturing explosives or articles containing explosive components, in the use of transportation of sameIn any place or establishment in which intoxicating alcoholic liquors are served or sold for consumption on the premises, or in which such liquors are manufactured or bottled; except as follows:In roofing operationsIn occupations which involve the handling or storage of blood, blood products, body fluids or body tissue
In or about plants manufacturing iron or steel, ore reduction works, smelters, foundries, forging shops, hot rolling mills or any place in which the heating melting or heat treating of metals is carried on– busboy and kitchen employment, not otherwise prohibited, when in connection with the service of meals at any private club, fraternal organization or veteran’s organization shall not be prohibited by this subsection;
– this subsection 13 does not apply to employment that is performed on property owned or operated by a park district, as defined in subsection (a) of Section 1-3 of the Park District Code, if the employment is not otherwise prohibited by law;
In excavating operations

Does a teen need to have a work permit or certificate to work in Georgia?

Georgia child labor laws prohibits employers from hiring 14- and 15-year-olds without an employment certificate (work permits). Business may employ youth who are 16- and 17-years-old without an employment certificate.

For 14- and 15-year-olds, they must take for following steps:

  • The teen must complete an online or paper employment certificate (see GA Dept. of Labor)
  • The teen must present the employment certificate to an employer who has offered to hire them, and the employer must provide relevant information about the work to be performed.
  • The teen’s school or school district will then either issued or deny the employment certificate.

Do Georgia have special child labor laws for child performers or actors?

Georgia child labor laws have special child law rules for minors who work in entertainment. More information about the laws and regulations for child actors and performers can be found at the GA Department of Labor – Minor in Entertainment page.


Are youth workers entitled to rest breaks or meal breaks?

In Georgia, employers are not required to provide minors with a unpaid meal breaks or rest breaks.

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