Washington Child Labor Laws

Washington child labor laws regulate the employment of youth in the state of Washington. These laws dictate the ages and the times as well as the types of work minors may perform. Washintgon’s child labor laws also require employers, before they may hire minors to work, to have work permit endorsements and parent/school authorization forms.

Youth who are 16 and 17 years old may work in a broad range of jobs but cannot work in jobs that have been determined to be too dangerous, hazardous, or inappropriate.

Youth who are 14 and 15 years old may work in a broader range of jobs but are significantly limited in the number of hours per day and per week they may work, especially when school is in session.

Generally, children 13 years old or younger may not work in Washington, except in some limited situations.

Table Of Contents
  1. What are the child labor rules for employers?
  2. What are the work rules for 16- and 17-year-old youth? 
  3. What are the work rules for 14- and 15-year-old youth? 
  4. What are the work rules for youth 13-year-old and younger? 
  5. Are there any industries that have special work rules for minors? 
  6. What are the penalties for employers who violate child labor laws?

What are the child labor rules for employers?

Washington requires all employers who employ youth under 18-years-old to comply with the state’s child labor laws except the following employers:

  • Newspaper vendors or carriers
  • Domestic or casual labor in or about private residences
  • Parents or stepparents who employ their children in house-to-house sales
  • Certain agricultural labor
  • Employers exempt from state child labor laws by federal law

WA Regs. 296-125-010, WA Regs. 296-125-015

Employers are prohibited from employing minors:

  • In begging, receiving alms, or in any mendicant occupation
  • In any indecent or immoral exhibition or practice
  • In any practice or exhibition dangerous or injurious to life, limb, health, or morals
  • As a messenger for delivering letters, telegrams, packages, or bundles to any know house of prostitution or assignation

WA Code 26.28-0707

Are work permit endorsements or parent/school authorization forms required before an employer may employ a minor?

To employ a minor, an employer must satisfy the following requirements:

  • Obtain, keep current, and post a work permit endorsement from the WA Department of Labor & Industry if the employers:
    • Employ one (1) or more minors
    • Allow one (1) or more minors to work at their place of business
    • Allow one (1) or more minors to work under work conditions controlled by the employer
  • Obtain a parent/school authorization form for each youth that works for the employer and keep copies of the forms on file
  • When necessary, obtain variances and/or special variances from child labor requirements (discussed below) and keep copies of the variances on file

Employers who sponsor approved bona fide unpaid work-based learning programs may not be required to obtain minor work permit endorsements for those programs.

WA Code 49.12.121, WA Code 49.12.123, WA Regs. 29-125-0200, WA Regs. 29-125-0210, WA Regs. 29-125-0223, WA Regs. 29-125-0224, WA Regs. 296-125-0260

Employers with more than one workplace must:

  • Obtain work permit endorsements for each workplace at which minors work
  • Keep current and post the work permit endorsement at each workplace where minors work

Does the employer’s work permit endorsement limit the number of youths it may have working at a given time?

WA child labor law allows employers to rely on a single endorsement to employ any number of minors at the workplace identified on the endorsement unless the WA Department of Labor & Industry modifies the endorsement. WA Regs. 296-125-0211

Can an employer’s work permit endorsement be restricted?

The WA Department of Labor & Industry may restrict the number of minors may have working at its workplace or the minors’ work conditions. WA Regs. 296-125-0211, WA 296-125-0220

Do employers’ work permit endorsement expire, and can they be renewed?

Under WA child labor requirements, an employer’s work permit endorsement expire one (1) year from the date it is issued by the WA Department of Labor & Industry. WA Regs. 296-125-0221

Employers may request to have their endorsements renewed.  However, the WA Department of Labor & Industry reserves the right to deny the renew if it concludes:

  • The employer failed to comply with a condition related to the prior endorsement
  • The employer violated WA’s child labor laws
  • There are existing conditions that would be detrimental to the health, safety, or welfare of the minors.

WA Regs. 296-125-0222, WA Regs. 296-125-0230

Can a work permit endorsement be revoked?

WA child labor regulations allow the Department of Labor & Industry to revoke an employer’s work permit endorsement if it determines that conditions exist that is or could be detrimental to the health, safety, or welfare of a youth that works for the employer.  If an employer appeals the Department of Labor & Industry’s decision to revoke an endorsement, the endorsement will remain in force until the appeal is resolved. WA Regs. 296-125-0230  An employer must file an appeal regarding the Department of Labor & Industry’s decision to revoke an endorsement within 30 days. WA Regs. 296-125-0321

Where can employers obtain a parent/school authorization form?

Employers can obtain a parent/school authorization by contacting the local office of the Department of Labor & Industry or sending a letter to:

Department of Labor and Industries, Employment Standards Section, P.O. Box 44510, Olympia, WA 98504-4510

WA Regs. 296-125-0261

By which date must employers have completed parent/school authorizations?

According to WA child labor laws, all parent/school authorizations expire each year on September 30.  Thus, each year by September 30, employers who want to employ minors must:

  • Obtain new parent/school authorization forms for each minor that will work for the employer
  • Make sure the forms are completed correctly
  • Keep copies of the forms on file

WA Regs. 296-125-0262

What information does a youth need to include in the parent/school authorization form?

To ensure a parent/school authorization form is complete, a minor must provide the following information:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Date of birth which may be supported by proof of a:
    • Birth certificate and Social Security card
    • Driver’s license
    • Baptismal record and Social Security card
    • Notarized statement of a parent or guardian
  • Whether they are employed at any other employer(s) and the total number of hours worked for each employer
  • Their signature

WA Regs. 296-125-0263

What information must a parent or legal guardian include in the parent/school authorization form?

To ensure a parent/school authorization form is complete, a parent or legal guardian must indicate on the form:

  • They do or do not authorize the minor to work for the identified employers.
  • They’re signature

WA Regs. 296.125-0265

A parent or legal guardian may revoke a minor’s work authorization given on a parent/school authorization from by notifying the WA Department of Labor & Industry. WA Regs. 296-125-0268

What information must an employer include in the parent/school authorization form?

To ensure a parent/school authorization form is complete, an employer must include on the form:

  • The workplace(s) where the youth will work
  • A description of the work the youth will perform
  • How many hours the youth will work each workweek
  • Its work permit endorsement number and its expiration date
  • Its unified business identifier (UBI) number
  • The employer’s or an authorized agent’s signature

WA Regs. 296-125-0264

What information must the school include in the parent/school authorization form?

To ensure a parent/school authorization form is complete, the school must include the following on the form:

  • If the youth will work during the school year, the form must:
    • Indicate that the school does or does not authorize the youth to work for the employer
    • Have the form signed by an authorized agent
  • If a youth begins working during school vacation and would like to continue working when school resumes, the youth may do so if the school has determined that the youth:
    • Maintains a level of scholastic achievement that is acceptable
    • Maintains good attendance at school
    • Is satisfactorily progressing toward graduation

WA Regs. 296-125-0265

A school may revoke a minor’s work authorization given on a parent/school authorization from by notifying the WA Department of Labor & Industry. WA Regs. 296-125-0268

What documentation must an employer obtain if a youth is no longer in school?

If a youth is no longer enrolled in school, an employer must obtain a certification from a parent or legal guardian of the minor that the youth is:

  • Unmarried
  • Living with a parent or legal guardian
  • No longer enrolled in school
  • Has not obtained a certificate of educational competence according to WA Code 28A.305.190 or is not enrolled in a bona fide college program

WA Regs. 296-125-0267

What documentation must an employer obtain if a youth is married or does not live with a parent and is not in school?

If a youth is married or not longer lives with a parent or legal guardian, an employer must obtain documentation from the youth:

  • Certify that they are either married or live independently from their parents or legal guardian
  • Certify that they are not enrolled in school
  • Provide the name and address of the last school they attended
  • Provide the name and address or telephone number of an adult emergency contact (not the employer) that certifies the minor is living independently of their parent or legal guardian

WA Regs. 296-125-0267

Can an employer obtain a variance from the typical child labor law restrictions?

Employers may request variances from WA child labor law restrictions from the WA Department of Labor & Industry or designee.  To request variances, employers must submit a written application to the Department of Labor & Industry providing:

  • the specific good cause reasons for the request,
  • that the variance will not harm the health, safety, welfare, and school attendance and performance of the minor,
  • the financial need of the minor’s family, and
  • if the minor has manifested a special talent.

WA Regs. 296-125-0600, WA Regs. 296-125-0610, WA Regs. 296-125-0611, WA Regs. 296-125-0640

Do variances expire and can they be renewed?

Variances from WA child labor law restrictions expire at the same time the work permit endorsements related to the variances expire. WA Regs. 296-125-0650  Whenever a work permit endorsement expires, an employer must apply for a new variance related to the request to renew the endorsement. WA Regs. 296-125-0651

Can an employer’s variance be revoked, suspended, or modified?

The WA Department of Labor & Industry may revoke, suspend, or modify an employer’s variance if it concludes that:

  • A necessary condition for the variance has not been or is no longer met
  • An employer has violated child labor laws

WA Regs. 296-125-0660  An employer must appeal the Department of Labor & Industry’s decision to revoke, suspend, or modify a variance within 30 days after the Department has issued it decision. WA Regs. 296-125-0670

Do employers have any recordkeeping requirements?

WA child labor laws require employers to keep records on file for three (3) years that contains:

  • Copies of completed parent/school authorization forms with any attachments
  • Copies of any variances

An employer must keep the required records safe and accessible at the employer’s place of business or a central recordkeeping office where records are customarily maintained. WA 296-125-0275


What are the work rules for 16- and 17-year-old youth? 

What days, times, and hours may 16- and 17-year-old youth work?

When school is in session 

When school is in session, minors who are 16- and 17-years-old may work during school hours unless the school district where the youth goes to school excuses school attendance.

During non-school hours, 16- and 17-year-olds may not work more than:

  • Four (4) hours per day on any school day before another school day or eight (8) hours on any other day
  • Six (6) days per week
  • Twenty-four (24) hours per week

Youth who are 16 or 17 years old may not work before 7:00 a.m.  Also, they may not work later than 10:00 p.m. on any day preceding a school day or 12:00 a.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, or days before a school holiday or vacation.

Employers who have 14- and 15-year-olds work in service occupations after 8:00 p.m. must ensure that the youth is supervised by a responsible adult employee who must be present the whole time the youth works.

WA Regs. 296-125-027

When school is not is session (school vacations)

When school is not in session (school vacations), minors who are 16- and 17-years-old may work may not work more than:

  • Eight (8) hours per day
  • Six (6) days per week
  • Forty-eight (48) hours per week

Youth who are 16 or 17 years old may not work before 5:00 a.m.  Also, they may not work later than 12:00 a.m.

Employers who have 16- and 17-year-olds work in service occupations after 8:00 p.m. must ensure that the youth is supervised by a responsible adult employee who must be present the whole time the youth works.

WA Regs. 296-125-027

Are there any special variances from child labor laws for 16- and 17-year-old youth?

Designated school districts or individual private schools may obtain approval from the WA Department of Labor & Industry to grant 16- and 17-year-old youth special variances.  The special variances allow school districts and individual private schools the ability facilitate the flexibility for 16- and 17-year-olds regarding school and work.  This may include extend the days, times, and/or hours a 16- or 17-year-old may work. WA Regs. 296-125-0700, WA Regs. 296-125-0710

To be valid, a special variance must be signed by the minor, the minor’s parent or guardian, the employer, and the authorized school official.  The special variance remains in force for the duration of the school in which it is granted. WA Regs. 296-125-0730, WA Regs. 296-125-0760 

When determining whether to grant a special variance, the authorized school official must consider at least the following factors:

  • If the employer holds a current valid minor work permit endorsement
  • The student’s attendance pattern
  • The student’s satisfactory academic progress
  • the student’s opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities
  • the number of school nights the student will work
  • how late in the evening the student will work
  • how long the student’s shifts will be
  • the student’s rationale for requesting a variance from the work hour restrictions

WA Regs. 296-125-0750

What must an employer do to hire a minor with a special variance?

If an employer would like to hire a minor with a special variance, it must obtain a special variance from the minor’s school district or individual private school and provide the following information:

  • The minor’s work duties
  • The maximum number of hours the minor will work each workweek
  • How long each shift the minor will work
  • How late the minor will work each day
  • The number of days each week the minor will be required to work in afternoons and evenings
  • The employer’s unified business identifier (UBI) number
  • The dates the employer’s work permit endorsements will expire

Once an employer obtains a special variance, it must then provide the form to the minor to complete. WA Regs. 296-125-0723

Can a special variance be revoked, suspended, or modified?

The school, a parent or legal guardian, or the WA Department of Labor & Industry may revoke, suspend, modify, or refuse renew a special variance. WA Regs. 296-125-0741, WA Regs. 296-125-0770, WA Regs. 296-125-0771 Request to appeal the decision to revoke, suspend, modify, or refuse renew a special variance must be filed within 30 days of the original decision. WA Regs. 296-125-0741, WA Regs. 296-125-0772

What are the meal and rest break requirements for 16- and 17-year-olds?

WA labor laws requires employers to provide meal and rest breaks to 16- and 17-year-old. WA Regs. 296-125-0287  For meal and rest break rules for 14- and 15-year-old in Washington, visit our Washington Meal and Rest Break Laws analysis.

Which occupations are considered too hazardous for 16- and 17-year-old youth? 

Washington has determined that no youth under the age of 18, unless exempt as discussed below, may perform work in any of the following occupations because the occupations have been determined to be unduly hazardous:

  • in or about operations that manufacture or store explosives or articles containing explosive components.
  • regularly driving motor vehicles
    • occasional driving is permissible if:
      • the minor has a valid state driver’s license for the type of driving involved;
      • driving is restricted to daylight hours;
      • is incidental to the minor’s employment;
      • the vehicle has a gross weight under 6,000 pounds;
      • the minor has completed a state-approved driver education course; and
      • there are functioning seat belts in the vehicle and the minor has been instructed to use them.
  • outside helper or flagger on any public road or highway
  • work which involves directing moving motor vehicles in or around warehouses or loading/unloading areas including but not limited to loading docks, transfer stations, or landfills, or work which involves towing vehicles.
  • operating a bus including occasionally.
  • mining occupations
  • logging occupations
  • operating any sawmill, lath mill, shingle mill, or cooperage-stock mill
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of any power-driven wood-working machines
  • work that involves potential exposure to radioactive substances and to ionizing radiation
  • operating, repair, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of elevators including riding on a manlift
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of power-driven metal-forming, punching, and shearing machines
  • slaughtering, meat packing, processing, or rendering
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of power-driven bakery machines
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of power-driven paper-products machines
  • work that involves manufacturing brick, tile, and kindred products
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of power-driven circular saws, band saws, and guillotine shears.
  • work that involves wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking operations
  • roofing operations
  • excavation operations
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of or working in proximity to earth-moving machines, hoisting apparatus, cranes, garbage-compactors, trash-compactors or other compactors, paper-balers or other balers, or other heavy equipment including, but not limited to, graders, bulldozers, earth compactors, backhoes, and tractors
    • Working in proximity means working within the radius of movement of any portion of the machinery where the youth could be struck or otherwise injured
    • the prohibit excludes work in proximity to ski-lift apparatus
  • work in establishments or workplaces being picketed during the course of a labor dispute
  • work as a nurse’s aide or assistant unless the minor is a student in a bona fide state-certified nursing training program or has successfully completed such a program
  • work as a maid or bellhop in motels or hotels, except when
    • the minor is accompanied by a responsible adult whenever the work requires the minor to enter an assigned guest room regardless of whether the room is occupied at the time the minor is in the room
    • the minor may work in unassigned, unoccupied guest rooms without an accompanied adult
  • work in sauna or massage parlors, body painting or tattoo studios, or adult entertainment establishments.
  • works that requires the minor to wear personal protective equipment (PPE) or wearing apparel required by the Department of Labor & Industry, division of Industrial Safety and Health, regarding hazardous substances exposure and/or hazardous noise exposure per chapters WA Regs 296-24 and 296-62 WAC
    • This rule does not include work that only requires youth to wear gloves, boots, or eye protection if the occupation is not otherwise prohibited
    • This rule does not include minors is a student in a bona fide health care career training or vocational education program.
  • firefighting and fire suppression duties
  • work where the youth has a risk of being exposed to bodily fluids or transmission of infectious agents, including but not limited to hepatitis and HIV, in accordance with standards established by WA Regs. 296-62-08001, which includes lab work that involves cleaning medical equipment used to draw or store blood or other contaminated tissue; duties which involve venipuncture; and duties involving work with laundry from health care facilities
    • This rule does not apply to a minor who is a student in a bona fide health care career training or vocational education program
    • This rule does not apply to state-certified lifeguards with first-aid training
  • work the involves potential exposure to hazardous substances which are considered to be carcinogenic, corrosive, highly toxic, toxic sensitizers, or which have been determined to cause reproductive health effects or irreversible end organ damage.
    • this rule does not include handling of such substances in sealed containers in retail situations.
    • this rule does not apply to any consumer product or hazardous substance, as those terms are defined by the Consumer Product Safety Act (15 U.S.C. 2051 et seq.) and the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (15 U.S.C. 1261 et seq.) and those statutes’ regulations, where the employer of a minor can demonstrate that a product or substance is used in the workplace in the same manner as normal consumer use, and which use results in a duration and frequency of exposure that is not greater than exposures experienced by consumers using the product or substance in conformity with the manufacturer’s instructions, provided that such exposures are not otherwise prohibited by work regarding the use of PPE discussed above.
  • selling to passing motorists on the public right of way candy, flowers, or other merchandise or commodities which does not include selling to motorists from a window counter is not prohibited.
  • work in or about boiler or engine rooms.
  • work performed more than ten (10) feet above ground or floor level
  • work in freezers, meat coolers, and all work in preparing meats for sale except:
    • wrapping, sealing, labeling, weighing, pricing, and stocking are permitted if work is performed away from meat-cutting and preparation areas
    • the rule does not apply to the occasional entry into freezers or coolers for obtaining stock or placing stock

WA child labor laws to not prohibit youth to work in certain hazardous occupations if the youth is:

  • participating in a bona fide cooperative vocational education program, diversified career experience program, or work experience program certified and monitored by the office of the superintendent of public instruction or the minor employee’s school district
  • involved in an apprenticeship program registered with the Washington state apprenticeship and training council

The exempted youth discussed above may engage in the following hazardous occupations:

  • power-driven wood-working machines
  • power-driven metal-forming, punching, and shearing machines
  • slaughtering, meat packing, processing, or rendering
  • power-driven paper-products machines
  • power-driven circular saws, band saws, and guillotine shears
  • roofing operations
  • excavation operations
  • firefighting and fire suppression operations

WA Regs. 296-125-030


What are the work rules for 14- and 15-year-old youth? 

What days, times, and hours may 14- and 15-year-old youth work?

When school is in session

When school is in session, minors who are 14- and 15-years-old may not work during school hours.

During non-school hours, 14- and 15-year-olds may not work more than:

  • Three (3) hours per day on any school day before another school day or eight (8) hours on any other day
  • Six (6) days per week
  • Sixteen (16) hours per week

Employers who have 14- and 15-year-olds work in service occupations after 8:00 p.m. must ensure that the youth is supervised by a responsible adult employee who must be present the whole time the youth works.

WA Regs. 296-125-027

When school is not in session (school vacations)

When school is not in session (during school vacations), minors who are 14- and 15-years-old may not work more than:

  • Eight (8) hours per day
  • Six (6) days per week
  • Forty (40) hours per week

Youth who are 14 or 15 years old may not work before 7:00 a.m.  Also, they may not work later than 9:00 p.m.

Employers who have 14- and 15-year-olds work in service occupations after 8:00 p.m. must ensure that the youth is supervised by a responsible adult employee who must be present the whole time the youth works.

WA Regs. 296-125-027

What are the meal and rest break requirements for 14- and 15-year-olds?

WA labor laws requires employers to provide meal and rest breaks to 14- and 15-year-old. WA Regs. 296-125-0285  For meal and rest break rules for 14- and 15-year-old in Washington, visit our Washington Meal and Rest Break Laws analysis.

Which occupations are considered too hazardous for 14- and 15-year-old youth?

Washington child labor laws prohibit 14- and 15-year-olds from working in any occupations found to be too hazardous for 16- and 17-year-olds.

Child labor laws also prohibit 14- and 15-year-old youth to work in any of the following occupations because they are determined to be too hazardous:

  • any manufacturing operations
  • operations that include but not limited to filleting of fish, dressing poultry, cracking nuts, commercial processing, canning, freezing or drying of foods
  • laundering as performed by commercial laundries and dry cleaning
  • any public messenger service including but not limited to work that is performed by foot, bicycle, or public transportation
  • occupations connected with transportation, warehouse and storage, communications and public utilities, or construction except office work related to these occupations is permitted if none of the minor’s work is performed on the transportation media or construction site.
  • specific areas of retail, food service or gasoline service station operations that include:
    • maintaining or repairing work
    • washing windows or other work requiring worker to be positioned at higher than ground or floor level
    • Cooking and baking
    • Operating, setting up, adjusting, cleaning, oiling or repairing power-driven food slicers and grinders, food choppers and cutters, and bakery-type mixers.
  • occupations that involve work in the operation of amusement parks, street carnivals, and traveling shows
  • loading and unloading goods to or from trucks, railroad cars, or conveyors.
  • operating, repairing, oiling, cleaning, adjusting, or setting up of or working in proximity to any power-driven machinery.

WA Regs. 296-125-033


What are the work rules for youth 13-year-old and younger? 

Washington child labor laws typically prohibit youth who are 13 years old or younger from working any labor in or in connection with a store, shop, factory, mine, or any inside employment not connected with farm or housework.  Youth who are 13 years old or young may perform the work listed above if they have written permit from a judge of a superior court of the count in which they live.

Also, Washington exempts 13-year-olds and younger from child labor work limitations when the youth is:

  • an actor or performer in film, video, audio, or theatrical productions
  • youth soccer referees what are certified by a national referee certification program

WA Code 26.28.060, WA Regs. 296-125-018


Are there any industries that have special work rules for minors? 

What are the child labor work rules for minors in the agricultural industry?

Washington law provides specific rules for minors working in the agricultural industry. WA Regs 296-131

What are the child labor work rules for house-to-house sales? 

Washington law provides specific rules for minors who engage in house-to-house sales. WA 296-125-024, WA 296-125-0620

What are the child labor work rules for minors who are actors or performers?

Washington law provides specific rules for minors who are actors or performers. WA Code 49.12.124


What are the penalties for employers who violate child labor laws?

Penalties for the first violation

For the first offense, except for serious violations, the WA Department of Labor & Industry will give an employer a citation of a violation and a reasonable amount of time to correct the violation.  If an employer does not correct the violation in the time given, the Department of Labor & Industry may assess a civil penalty to the employer not to exceed $1,000 for each day the violation continues.  In determining the amount of the fine, the Department of Labor & Industry will consider the size of the business and the gravity of the violation.  Within 30 days, the employer must pay for the fine or file a notice to appeal with the Department. WA Code 49.12.390

Employers who knowingly or recklessly violate child labor laws are guilty of a gross misdemeanor. WA Code 49.12.410

Serious violations

If the Department determines that the first office includes a serious violation, the Department will not give the employer an opportunity to correct the violation.  Instead, it will assess a civil penalty to the employer not to exceed $1,000.  Moreover, the Department may issue a restraining order to the employer ordering the employer to cease any activities that have or reasonably could result in a serious violation.   A serious violation exists if “death or serious physical harm has resulted or is imminent from a condition that exists, or from one or more practices, means, methods, operations, or processes that have been adopted or are in use by the employer, unless the employer did not, and could not with the exercise of reasonable diligence, know of the presence of the violation.” WA Code 49.12.390

Employers whose violation of child labor laws results in the death or permanent disability of a minor is guilty of a Class C felony. WA Code 49.12.410

Penalties for repeated violations

When an employer subsequently violates child labor laws, the Department of Labor & Industry will assess a civil penalty to the employer not to exceed $1,000 for each day the violation continues.  In determining the amount of the fine, the Department of Labor & Industry will consider the size of the business and the gravity of the violation.  Within 30 days, the employer must pay for the fine or file a notice to appeal with the Department. WA Code 49.12.390

Failing to post child labor law rules

The Department may assess fees to employees who fail to properly post child labor laws as required not to exceed $100 for each violation. WA Code 49.12.390, WA Department of Labor & Industry: Forms and Publications

Notice of Inspections

Any individual that gives advance notice that the Department will be conducting a child labor law inspection without the prior consent of the Department may be fined not more than $100. WA Code 49.12.390


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