Vermont Employment Law Updates – 2018

May
May 30 – Gov. Scott signed a law implementing a new remote worker grant program

On May 30, 2018, Governor Scott signed Senate Bill 94. The law creates a new remote worker grant program. Under the program, a new remote worker may receive a grant for qualifying remote worker expenses including relocation, software and hardware, internet access, etc. An new remote worker is an individual who:

  • is a full-time employee of a business domiciled or with a primary place of business in Vermont,
  • becomes a resident of Vermont on or after January 1, 2019; and
  • performs a majority of their work duties remotely from a home office or a co-working space in Vermont.
The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 28 – Gov. Scott signed a bill making changes to the state’s sexual harassment law

On May 28, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 707. The law makes changes to the state’s sexual harassment rules. The changes include prohibiting employers from requiring employees or applicants to agree to non-disclosure agreements related to sexual harassment in the workplace. It also provides retaliation protection for employees who file claims related to sexual harassment or participate in any investigation. Other changes were made as well.

The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 28 – Gov. Scott signed a law granting crime victims discrimination protection and leave from work rights

On May 28, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 711. The law grants crime victims protected class status making it unlawful for employers to discriminate against them due to the crime victim status. It also requires employers to provide qualifying employees who are crime victims with unpaid leave from work to attend depositions or court proceedings related to the crime.

The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 21 – Gov. Scott signed a law prohibiting employers from asking applicant about current or past compensation

On May 21, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 294. The law prohibits employers from:

  • inquiring about an applicant’s current or past compensation from either the applicant or the applicant’s current or former employer
  • requiring applicants’ current or past compensation meet minimum or maximum criteria
  • determining whether to interview applicants based on their current or past compensation

Other requirements and restriction apply.

The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 21 – Gov. Scott signed a law clarifying the retaliation provisions of the Workers’ Compensation law
On May 21, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 731. The law clarifies what behaviors by employees in relations to violations of the Workers’ Compensation law are protected from retaliation. The new law protects employees from retaliation when they have “filed a complaint or reported a violation of [the law], or has testified, assisted, or cooperated in any manner with the Department or other appropriate governmental agency or department in an investigation of misclassification, discrimination, or other violation of this chapter.” (new changes are underlined)
The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 21 – Gov. Scott signed a law changing the enforcement provisions of the state’s Occupational Safety and Health Act
On May 21, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 731. The law makes changes to the enforcement provisions of the state’s Occupational Safety and Health Act.
The new law became effective when signed.
May
May 30 – Gov. Scott signed a law implementing a new remote worker grant program

On May 30, 2018, Governor Scott signed Senate Bill 94. The law creates a new remote worker grant program. Under the program, a new remote worker may receive a grant for qualifying remote worker expenses including relocation, software and hardware, internet access, etc. An new remote worker is an individual who:

  • is a full-time employee of a business domiciled or with a primary place of business in Vermont,
  • becomes a resident of Vermont on or after January 1, 2019; and
  • performs a majority of their work duties remotely from a home office or a co-working space in Vermont.
The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 28 – Gov. Scott signed a law granting crime victims discrimination protection and leave from work rights

On May 28, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 711. The law grants crime victims protected class status making it unlawful for employers to discriminate against them due to the crime victim status. It also requires employers to provide qualifying employees who are crime victims with unpaid leave from work to attend depositions or court proceedings related to the crime.

The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 21 – Gov. Scott signed a law prohibiting employers from asking applicant about current or past compensation

On May 21, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 294. The law prohibits employers from:

  • inquiring about an applicant’s current or past compensation from either the applicant or the applicant’s current or former employer
  • requiring applicants’ current or past compensation meet minimum or maximum criteria
  • determining whether to interview applicants based on their current or past compensation

Other requirements and restriction apply.

The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 21 – Gov. Scott signed a law clarifying the retaliation provisions of the Workers’ Compensation law
On May 21, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 731. The law clarifies what behaviors by employees in relations to violations of the Workers’ Compensation law are protected from retaliation. The new law protects employees from retaliation when they have “filed a complaint or reported a violation of [the law], or has testified, assisted, or cooperated in any manner with the Department or other appropriate governmental agency or department in an investigation of misclassification, discrimination, or other violation of this chapter.” (new changes are underlined)
The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
May 21 – Gov. Scott signed a law changing the enforcement provisions of the state’s Occupational Safety and Health Act
On May 21, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 731. The law makes changes to the enforcement provisions of the state’s Occupational Safety and Health Act.
The new law became effective when signed.
January
January 22 – Gov. Scott signed a law legalizing the recreational use of marijuana
On January 22, 2018, Governor Scott signed House Bill 511. The law makes the use of marijuana for recreational purposes legal with some restrictions and limitations.
The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018.
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