Nevada Wage Payment Laws




Frequency of Wage Payments

An employer must pay wages two (2) times per month (semi-monthly), unless otherwise exempt. If paying two (2) times per month, an employer must pay all wages earned and unpaid before the first day of any month not later than 8:00 a.m. on the 15th day of the month following the month in which the wages or compensation was earned. An employer must pay all wages earned and unpaid before the 16th day of any month not later than 8:00 a.m. on the last day of the same month. An employer and employee may enter in a contract agreeing to the payment of wages more frequently than semimonthly, but the employer cannot require the employee to sign such an agreement as a term or condition of employment.

An employer in Nevada whose principal place of business is located, and whose payroll is prepared, outside of Nevada may designate one or more days in each month as fixed paydays for the payment of wages to an employee employed in:

  • a bona fide executive, administrative or professional capacity;
  • the capacity of outside salesman; or
  • the capacity of a supervisor.

Nevada Stat. 608.060

An employer must establish and maintain regular paydays and must post and maintain posted notices, printed in plain type or written in plain script, in at least two (2) conspicuous places where such notices can be seen by the employees, setting forth the regular paydays as prescribed in this chapter and the place of payment, which must be within the Justice Court precinct in which such services were performed.

If an employee is absent at the time and place of the payment of wages or compensation, an employer must pay the employee within five (5) days of the employee’s demand for payment.

Nevada Stat. 608.080




Manner of Wage Payments

An employer may pay employees by:

  • cash
  • check redeemable at face value with deduction or fee
  • any other manner agreed to by the employee

Nevada Stat. 608.120

An employer may use an electronic payment system, including, but not limited to, direct deposit, debit card or similar payment system if:

  • The employee can obtain immediate payment in full;
  • The employee receives at least one free transaction per pay period and any fees or other charges are prominently disclosed to and subject to the written consent of the employee;
  • The location of payment is easily and readily accessible to the employee;
  • There are no other requirements or restrictions that a reasonable person would find to be an unreasonable burden or inconvenience; and
  • The use of an electronic payment system is optional at the election of the employee.

Nev. Admin. Code 608.135



Direct Deposit

An employer can pay employees by direct deposit, if:

  • The employee can obtain immediate payment in full;
  • The employee receives at least one free transaction per pay period and any fees or other charges are prominently disclosed to and subject to the written consent of the employee;
  • The location of payment is easily and readily accessible to the employee;
  • There are no other requirements or restrictions that a reasonable person would find to be an unreasonable burden or inconvenience; and
  • The use of an electronic payment system is optional at the election of the employee.

Nev. Admin. Code 608.135



Payment upon Separation from Employment

Employees who are fired, discharged, terminated, or laid off

When an employer discharges or lays off an employee, the employer must pay the employee all wages due immediately. Nevada Stat. 608.020; Nevada Stat. 608.050

Employees who quit or resign

When an employee quits, the employer must pay the employee all wages due on the earlier of:

  • the day on which he or she would have regularly been paid the wages or compensation; or
  • seven (7) days after he resigns or quits.

Nevada Stat. 608.030

Employees who are suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (strike)

Nevada does not have a law specifically addressing the payment of wages to an employee who leaves employment due to a labor dispute, however, to ensure compliance with known laws, an employer should pay employee all wages due on the earlier of:

  • the day on which he or she would have regularly been paid the wages or compensation; or
  • seven (7) days after he resigns or quits.

Nevada Stat. 608.030



Wages in Dispute

Nevada does not have any laws requiring an employer to pay an employee wages conceded to be due when involved in a wage dispute with the employee.



Deductions from Wages

An employer may not make any other deductions from an employee’s wages, unless:

  • The employer has a reasonable basis to believe the employee is responsible for the amount being deducted by the employer, including
    • cash shortages
    • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property
    • required uniforms
    • required tools
    • other items necessary for employment
  • The deduction is for a specific purpose, pay period and amount; and the wages.

An employer may not use a blanket authorization that was made in advance by the employee to withhold any amount from the wages due the employee.

An employer may not withhold or deduct wages from an employees paycheck, unless:

  • required or permitted by state or federal law or
  • consented to in writing by the employee

An employer may make the following deductions from an employee’s wages without the written authorization:

  • Any amount required by law; and
  • Any employee contribution to a benefit program, such as health insurance or a pension plan.

Nevada Stat. 608.110; Nev. Admin. Code 608.160



Uniforms, Tools, and Other Equipment Necessary for Employment

An employer cannot require an employee to pay for a uniform or the cleaning of the uniform if it requires a special cleaning process. A uniform is defined as distinctive clothing which an employee of a business is required to wear and which serves as a clear means of identifying the employee with the business. Nevada Stat. 608.165; Nev. Admin. Code 608.090



Pre-hire Medical, Physical, or Drug Tests

Nevada does not have any laws prohibiting an employer from requiring an applicant or employee to pay the cost of a medical examination or the cost of furnishing any records required by the employer as a condition of employment.



Notice of Wage Reduction

An employer must give employees at least seven (7) days written notice before reducing their wage rate. Nevada Stat. 608.100



Statement of Wages (Pay Stub)

At the time of payment of wages, an employer must furnish employees with an itemized list showing the deductions made from wages. Nevada Stat. 608.110



Record Keeping Requirements

An employer must establish and maintain for at least 2 years records of wages for the benefit of his employees, showing for each pay period the following information for each employee:

  • Gross wage or salary other than compensation in the form of:
    • services; or
    • food, housing or clothing.
  • Deductions.
  • Net cash wage or salary.
  • Total hours employed in the pay period by noting the number of hours per day.
  • Date of payment.

Nevada Stat. 608.115



Notice Requirements

An employer must post and maintain posted notices, printed in plain type or written in plain script, in at least two (2) conspicuous places where such notices can be seen by the employees, setting forth the regular paydays and the place of payment, which must be within the Justice Court precinct in which such services were performed.

An employer must give employees at least seven (7) days notice before any change is made to any payday or place of payment.

Nevada Stat. 608.080