Connecticut Minimum Wage Laws




Minimum wage amount

Connecticut’s current minimum wage is $9.60. CT Statutes 31-58; CT Public Act No. 14-1

Connecticut’s minimum wage will increase to $10.10 on January 1, 2017. CT Public Act No. 14-1

Connecticut’s minimum wage law provides that its minimum wage will increase to be one-half of one percent more than the federal minimum wage when it increases, rounded to the nearest whole cent. Any increase to Connecticut’s minimum wage resulting from an increase to the federal minimum wage rate takes effect on the same day as the federal rate change. CT Statutes 31-58(j)

Connecticut employers must also comply with federal minimum wage laws, which currently sets the federal minimum wage at $7.25. See FLSA: Minimum Wage.

If an employer chooses to pay employees minimum wage, the employer must pay those employees in accordance with the minimum wage law, either federal or state, that results in the employees being paid the higher wage. In most instances in Connecticut, the Connecticut minimum wage will apply as it generally guarantees a higher wage rate for employees than federal law.





Tip minimum wage

Connecticut’s minimum wage for service employees is $6.07. Its minimum wage for bartenders who customarily receive tips is $7.82. CT Statute 31-60(b); CT Reg. 31-60-2(b); CT Reg. 31-62-E1(b)

Connecticut defines gratuities as voluntary monetary contributions by customers given directly to employees for services rendered. CT Reg. 31-62-E2(e) A service employee is an employee who performs duties that relate entirely to serving food and/or beverages to customers seated at tables or booths and who customarily and regularly receives a minimum of $10 per week in tips if full-time or a minimum of $2 per day in tips if part-time. CT Reg. 31-62-E2(c) Employees who serve food and/or beverages but not to customers seated at tables, such as countergirls, counterwaitresses, countermen, and counterwaiters, are not service employees. CT Reg. 31-62-E2(d)

If an employer chooses to pay service employees or bartenders their respective tipped minimum wage, they must also ensure that the service employees and bartenders are paid at least the standard minimum wage when tipped wages earned are combined with tips received. Employers are required to obtain from tipped employees on a weekly basis a signed statement certifying that the amount of tips taken by the employers as a credit towards its obligation to pay the standard minimum wage were received by the employee. Employers must also maintain a record on a weekly basis of the tip credits they have taken towards their obligation to pay the standard minimum wage. CT Reg. 31-60-2; CT Reg. 31-62-E3

When service employees perform non-service work, employers may pay the service employees tipped wages for the time spent performing qualifying service work only if the qualifying service work can be definitively segregated from the non-service work. CT Reg. 31-62-E4-E5

Beauty shops may not take a tip credit for employees who receive tips; instead, it must pay all employees the standard minimum wage regardless of tips received. CT Reg. 31-62-24-A5



Tip pooling and sharing

Connecticut minimum wage law does not address tip (gratuity) pooling or sharing arrangements. The standards set forth pursuant to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act regarding tip pooling and sharing may provide reasonable guidance.



Subminimum wage

Employees with disabilities

Connecticut minimum wage laws permit employers to pay employees with disabilities a wage rate lower than the standard minimum wage if they obtain a special license from the Connecticut Department of Labor permitting it to do so. < a href= “http://www.cga.ct.gov/2001/pub/Chap558.htm#sec31-60.htm” target=”_blank”>CT Statute 31-67



Trainees

Connecticut minimum wage laws allow employers to pay beginners a wage rate that is no less than 85 percent of the standards minimum wage for the first 200 hours of employment. Sec. 31-58(j)



Apprentices

Connecticut minimum wage laws allow employers to pay apprentices a wage rate lower than the standard minimum wage if they obtain permission from the Connecticut Department of Labor to do so. An apprentice is an individual who is employed to learn a skilled trade in a bona fide apprentice program under an indenture of apprenticeship approved by the Connecticut State Apprenticeship Council of the Department of Labor. CT Statute 31-60; CT Reg. 31-62-8



Learners

Connecticut minimum wage laws allow employers to pay learners a wage rate that is no less than 85 percent of the standards minimum wage for the first 200 hours of employment if they obtain permission from the Connecticut Department of Labor to do so. A learner is an individual who is enrolled in an established program which provides vocational training in an occupation that is not apprenticeable but for which a training period may extend over a considerable length of time. CT Statute 31-60; CT Reg. 31-62-7



Student learners

Connecticut minimum wage laws do not allow employers to pay student learners less than the standard minimum wage. Employers must pay trainees the standard minimum wage rate, unless otherwise exempt.



Student workers

Connecticut minimum wage laws do not allow employers to pay student workers less than the standard minimum wage. Employers must pay trainees the standard minimum wage rate, unless otherwise exempt.