Connecticut Leave Laws




Vacation Leave

In Connecticut, an employer is not required to provide its employees with vacation benefits, either paid or unpaid. If an employer chooses to provide such benefits, it must comply with the terms of its established policy or employment contract. See Conn. Stat. 31-76k; Gagnon v. Housatonic Valley Tourism Dist. Comm., 888 A.2d 104, 92 Conn. App. 835 (2006); Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001); Fulco v. The Norwich Roman Catholic Diocesan Corp., 609 A.2d 1034, 27 Conn. App. 800 (1992).

An employer may lawfully establish a policy or enter into a contract denying employees payment for accrued vacation leave upon separation from employment. See Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001).



An employer may lawfully establish a policy or enter into a contract disqualifying employees from payment of accrued vacation upon separation from employment if they are terminated. See Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001).

An employer may also lawfully establish a policy or enter into a contract disqualifying employees from payment of accrued vacation upon separation from employment if they fail to comply with specific requirements, such as giving two weeks notice or being employed as of a specific date of the year. See Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001).

An employer is required to pay accrued vacation to an employee upon separation from employment if its policy or contract requires it. Conn. Stat. 31-76k.

An employer is not required to pay accrued vacation leave upon separation from employment if the employer’s established policy or employment contract is silent on the matter, unless the employer has established a practice of doing so. See Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001)

An employer may lawfully cap the amount of leave an employee may accrue over time. See Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001).

An employer would also likely be free to implement a “use-it-or-lose-it” policy requiring employees to use their leave by a set date or lose it. See Santengelo v. Elite Beverage, Inc., 783 A.2d 500, 65 Conn. App. 618 (2001).



Sick Leave

Connecticut has a law that requires certain employers to provide employees classified as service workers with paid sick leave benefits, the details of which can be found on our Connecticut Sick Leave Law page. CT Div. of Wage and Workplace Standards FAQs. Employers are not required to provide sick leave benefits to non-service worker employees. If an employer chooses to provide sick leave benefits, it must comply with the terms of its established policy or employment contract.

An employer in Connecticut may be required to provide an employee unpaid sick leave in accordance with Connecticut’s Family and Medical Leave Act and the federal Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws.

To learn more about Connecticut’s sick leave law, visit our Connecticut Sick Leave Law page.



Holiday Leave

Connecticut law does not require private employers to provide employees with either paid or unpaid holiday leave. In Connecticut, a private employer can require an employee to work holidays. A private employer does not have to pay an employee premium pay, such as 1½ times the regular rate, for working on holidays, unless such time worked qualifies the employee for overtime under standard overtime laws. If an employer chooses to provide either paid or unpaid holiday leave, it must comply with the terms of its established policy or employment contract. CT Div. of Wage and Workplace Standards FAQs.

State holidays

Visit our Connecticut State Holidays page for a list of holidays recognized and observed by the state of Connecticut as well as information regarding state laws governing holiday leave for public employers and employees.



Jury Duty Leave

An employer must pay full-time employees regular wages for the first five days, or part thereof, of jury service, unless the employer has been excused by the Chief Court Administrator from compensating the employee. To be excused from compensating a juror, an employer must submit a written application to the Chief Court Administrator. The Chief Administrator must find the employer is subject to financial hardship sufficient to justify excusing them from the compensation obligation. In cases where an employer is excused for compensating an employee for jury service, the state will compensate the employee for the first five days of jury service, not to exceed $50 per day.

An employee is not considered a full-time employed juror on any day of jury service in which the person (1) would not have accrued regular wages if they were not serving as a juror on that day, or (2) would not have worked more than one-half of a shift which extends into another day if they were not serving as a juror on that day. Each juror not considered a full-time employed juror on a particular day is reimbursed by the state of Connecticut for necessary out-of-pocket expenses incurred during that day of jury service, provided the day of service falls within the first five days, or part thereof, of jury service. Connecticut Stat. 51-247a

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee for receiving or responding to a jury summons or for serving on a jury.

Any employee who has served eight hours of jury duty in any one day is deemed to have worked a legal day’s work and an employer cannot require the employee to work in excess of eight hours as dictated by Connecticut Stat. 31-21; Connecticut Stat. 51-247a



Voting Leave

Connecticut does not have a law which requires an employer to grant its employees leave, either paid or unpaid, to vote.



Bereavement Leave

Connecticut law does not require employers to provide employees bereavement leave or leave to attend funerals. Bereavement leave is leave that is taken by an employee due to the death of another individual, usually a close relative. Employers may choose to provide bereavement leave and may be required to comply with any bereavement policy or practice they maintain.